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AWO YO’OOBA 101 – Part 1 ( Must Read/Learn for Every Yo’ooba Man/Woman)

1. AWO YORUBA THE LANGUAGE OF IFÁ GLOSSARY OF TERMS USED IN IFÁ DIVINATION Awo Fa’lokun Fatunmbi Egbe Iwa Pele

2. Introduction In order to understand the oral tradition of Ifa it is necessary to have some grasp of the language of Ifa. The rituals, invocations, incantations and recitations of traditional Yoruba religion are not expressed through conversational Yoruba. The language of Ifa is liturgical Yoruba (ofo ase), a language used among diviners to express transcendant ideas. Many of the words used in Ifa have a tonal resonance used to access the power of Spirit. Physics teaches the idea that all power in the universe is part of a sign wave which is the full spectrum of light. Every segment of the sign wave manifests as both color and pitch. The tonal quality of words used in liturgical Yoruba places the diviner in harmonic resonance with the tonal essence of a wide range of Spiritual Forces (Orisa). The remarkable quality of liturgical Yoruba is that the words used for invocation also carry meaning that reveals the inner essense of the Spiritual Force itself. For example, the word Obatala is used to describe the Force in Nature science calls white light. Ifa teaches that everything in the universe has some form of consciousness (ori). Saying the word Obatala places human consciousness in alighnment with the consciousness of white light. It does while telling us something about the quality of white light. The word Obatala is an eliysian of the phrase; O (Spirit) ba (power of expansion or male energy ie; Baba) ota (stone) ala (light). The word

3. Obatala in the context of Odu Ifa (Yoruba Scripture) means; the Spirit of the expansive quality of light that comes from the eternal stone of Creation (center point of the universe). Olatunde Sproye in his book Yoruba without Tears states there are one hundred and twenty-six combinations of vowels and consonants used as the basis for the Yoruba Language. ba be be bi bo bo bu da de de di do do du fa fe fe fi fo fo fu ga ge ge gi go go gu gba gbe gbe gbi gbo gbo gbu ha he he hi ho ho hu ja je je ji jo jo ju ka ke ke ki ko ko ku la le le li lo lo lu ma me me mi mo mo mo mu na ne ne ni no no nu pa pe pe pi po po pu ra re re ri ro ro ru sa se se si so so su ta te te ti to to tu wa we we wi wo wo wu ya ye ye yi yo yo yu All Yoruba words are a combination of these fundamental sounds. One of the rules of Yourba language construction is that portions of a word can be doubled for a change in emphasis, for example; ba (expansive power) baba (father) babagba or baba baba (grandfather). Doubling a word refers to its source or parent, for example Dada (Spirit of Vegitation) would be the parent of da (create). Repeating the word da (create) suggests recreation or the power of vegitation to continiously go throw the process of birth, growth, death and rebirth.

4. If we double each of the one hundred and twenty-six combinations used as the basis for Yoruba language we get two hundred and fifty-two fundamental linguistic buiding blocks. Ifa scripture is based on two hundred and fifty six fundamental principles. The first four principles represent the cycle of birth, life, death and rebirth. These four principles support the rest of Creation. The rest of Creation comes into being through the manifestation of two hundred and fifty two Forces in Nature. This suggests to me the foundation of Yoruba language has been linked to Odu Ifa from it’s inception. The first Yoruba English dictionaries were prepared by Christian missionaries who had no understanding or desire to learn the spiritual mysteries preserved in the Yoruba language. When Ifa and Orisa spread through the Diaspora it was influenced by non African religions concepts. I believe the best way to uncover the fundamental principles of Ifa as it was originally invisioned is through a study of the liturgical language.


 

When I wrote the book Iwa-pele I looked up the word Ifayabale in the Yoruba English dictionary in an effort to better understand a metaphysical concept. To me the word Ifayabale is an eliysian of Ifa (wisdom) iya (mother) baba (father) ile (earth), meaning; the wisdom of the fathers and mothers found on earth.


 

5. This glossary is a preliminary attempt to understand Ifa theology through an understanding of Yoruba language. The words were taken from Odu Ifa as it is recited in Ile Ife and most of the vocabulary reflects the dialect of that particular region. I am sure many of my definitions will change as my understanding of Ifa and Yoruba language grows. This should not be considered a definitive study. Hopefully it will serve as a point of departure for theological linquistic analysis. Bit by bit we eat the head of the rat. Ase o Awo Fa’lokun Fatunmbi

6. A a Him, her, we and it, depending on context. a Used as a prefix to a verb in the formation of nouns. ààbò Half. ààfin Palace, home of a king (Oba). ààjà Whirlwind, the Spirit of the Whirlwind, depending on context. ààjò Care, treatment. àáké Ax. ààlà Boundary, border. ààrè Illness, fatigue. àárín Middle, center. àasà Female Spirit, female Force in Nature. ààsè Door carved from the Iroko tree. Àáyán – awo – inú – igbó Praise name for the Spirit of Destiny (Òrúnmìlà), meaning: “Ayan Tree is the Mystery of the Inner Sanctum of the Sacred Grove.” ààyè Life. abà A portion, a piece of something larger, farm hut depending on context. abá Mat. The mat is used to create sacred space in Ifá and Òrìsà ritual and divination. àba Ladder. The ladder is sacred to the Spirit of the Divine Messenger (Èsù)

7. abádà Eternal, something that comes directly from the Source of Creation (Olórún). abáfù Fate in all of its manifestations, both creative and destructive. abàmi An unusual occurrence, something that is perceived as strange, frequently associated with intervention from the Spirit Realm. abámò Feelings of regret, being sorry about past actions. A – bá – mò – ó – tán – ìbá – se Praise name for the Spirit of Destiny (Òrúnmìlà), meaning: “To Have Full Knowledge of You is to be Successful.” Abanigbele The Spirit of Fire, this is a reference to the animating consciousness that exists inside a burning flame. Abánigbèro Advisor, one who gives advice, a wise elder. abanijé Detractor. àbáse Cooperation. Abata Mud. Mud is sacred to the female aspect of the Spirit of White Cloth (Oduduwa/Yemo). Abaya Queen Mother. abe Small knife, also used to refer to a razor. abé Bottom, behind a reference to the human buttux. When Ifá scripture is refering to reproductive organs it is usually expressed as either the male or female bottom. abèbe Fan, used to cool mediums in ritual, sacred to the Spirit of the River (Òsun). Abélà Candle. abéré Needle. Abesè Chief messenger of a religious society or extended family. àbètélè Bribe. abi I or you.

8. àbí Or. abigba Four chains with nuts attached, used in some regions of Nigeria to perform divination. Each chain has four nuts representing one leg of the marks used to represent the verses (Odù) of Ifá scripture. When the abigba is thrown two complete verses (Odù) of Ifá scripture are marked. Abíkehin The youngest child in a family. àbíku A child who dies at a young age and reincarnates through the same mother. The word refers to the spiritual cause behind a sequence of deaths among children in the same family. When this occurs, Ifá can perform rituals that will induce the spirit of the child to remain on Earth to become an adult. abiléko Wife or widow. abo Female. abo Arrival, return. àbo Expression used to greet someone who has returned to the place of their departure. Abògán Those who worship the ant hill, the ant hill represents the Spirit of hard work and cooperation. Abògún Those who worship the Spirit of Iron (Ògún). abókulò One who works with the spirit of ancestors (Egún) to invoke transformation. Abomalè Those who worship the ancestors and the deified ancestors (Egúngún). Abòpa Member of a society that gives reverence to the memory of the ancestors through the use of mediums. Abòrìsà Those who worship Forces in Nature (Òrìsà). aboyún Woman who is pregnant. aborí The elevation of consciousness through the use of invocation and spiritual cleansing. It is the process of placing the physical self and the higher self in perfect alignment.

9. àború, àboyè, àbosise Traditional Ifá greeting, meaning: ” I lift your burden from Earth and raise it to the Realm of the Immortals.” abuké Person with a deformity in their spine, protected by the Spirit of the King of White Cloth (Obàtálá). Abuku Disgrace àbule Village or house on the farm. abúléko Farm village. abúra One who takes an oath during an initiation, the person who makes a pledge. àbúrò Younger relative, junior relative. àbusí A blessing given by an elder. àdá A large knife with a hook on the end used in farming, sacred to the Spirit of Iron (Ògún) and the Spirit of the Farm (Òrìsà Oko). adaba Dove, sacred to the Spirit of the King of White Cloth (Obàtálá). The dove is the Ifá symbol for peace and tranquility. àdá – fàdákà Silver cutlass, sacred to the Spirit of the King of White Cloth (Obàtálá). Adáhunse A herbal doctor, one who works with the Spirit of herbs and medicine (Òsányin). àdá – irín Iron cutlass, sacred to the Spirit of Iron (Ògún), Adámu – Òrìsà A play performed in honor of the Spirit of the Forces in Nature (Òrìsà), centers around the idea of not laughing at, or making fun of those who have some form of disability. àdán Bat. The bat is used in medicine for protection. adánri One who has shaved their head for religious reasons, usually in preparation for initiation. Some diviners keep their head shaved as a way of being in close alignment with the influence of the Forces of Nature (Òrìsà).

10. adé Crown worn by Yorùbá Kings (Oba). The crown symbolizes the spiritual transformation that occurs when the Kings (Oba) are installed in office. The crown is also the seat of protection that is given by the Spirit of the Mothers (Ìyáàmi). adèbo One who prepares sacred food for a feast by slaughtering animals according to the rules of religious sanction. àdéhùn Agreement. adému An offering of food to the Spirits, also refers to a calabash with a lid depending on context. Adéseék Son of the Spirit of Destiny (Òrúnmìlà), meaning: “Crown is Worthy.” adibo Diviner. adìe Chicken, or fowl. adímu A form of masquerade in memory of the ancestors (Egún). adire Dyed cloth. adireiranna The fowl used as an offering at a traditional Ifá funeral. Adógunsílè The chief warrior priest among those who worship the Spirit of Iron (Ògún). Traditionally this is the person responsible for the protection of a given town or village. àdúgbò District, section of a village. A dúpé We thank you. àdúrà Prayer that generally follows an invocation to the Spirits. This type of prayer is a spontaneous appeal to the Spirits. afá Bridge. afàiya The ability to make use of intuition. afárá Bridge. afára – oyin Honeycomb (Bridge of Honey). The honeycomb is sacred to the Spirit of the River (Osun).

11. afári Barber, the person who shaves the head of an initiate during religious rites of passage. The word is also used to refer to the person who has had their head shaved. aféèrí Thing that disappears, a Spirit that vanishes. Afefe A messenger of the Spirit of the Wind (Oya), the gale wind. Afefe – jeje The whirlwind, the sacred power of the Spirit of the Wind (Oya) in its most intense manifestation. afe – imojo The tail of a large rat that is used by Yorùbá Kings as a symbol of their power of the word. afémóju The early morning, one of the times considered sacred for picking herbs. Aferef e Praise name for the Spirit of the Wind (Oya), the gentle aspect of the wind, the breeze, meaning: “The Good Wind.” Aférifé légélégé Praise name for the Spirit of the Wind (Oya) , meaning: “Mysterious Wind.” àfésónà Engaged to be married, committed to a relationship. afi Unless. afi – bi Unless. àfín Albino, protected by the Spirit of the King of White Cloth (Obàtálá). àfojúbà Personal experience, personal truth. afójú Blind person, protected by the Spirit of the King of White Cloth (Obàtálá). àfomó Infectious disease, that which is brought by the Spirit of Infectious Disease (Babaluaiyé). Afon Breadfruit (Treculia africana ), sacred to Ifá. àfonífojì Valley. aforíjì Forgiveness, also refers to a type of prayer used in Ifá for asking Spirit to forgive the need to make a blood offering.

12. àfòse Magical incantations. Afurùkèrèsayo Reference to the left half of the horizontal line that forms the equal arm cross of a Ifá diviner’s tray, meaning: “The one who has the diviner’s tapper and is happy.” aga Chair, low stool., in Ifá ritual the younger initiates will sit on a mat while the elders sit on low stools. agada Toy sword usually made from wood. àgalamòsà Rebel, the word suggests that the rebellion is guided by wisdom and divine inspiration. àgàn Barren woman. agaro Shovel. The shovel is sacred to the Spirit of the Farm (Orìsà Oko). Agayu The Spirit of the Fire at the Center of the Earth, in some versions of Ifá sacred history, Agayu is the Father of the Spirit of Lightning (Sàngó). àgba Manhood, someone who is recognized as a male adult in the community. This status usually comes as the result of completion of a rite of passage. àgbà Elder person of either gender, a stem used as a rope depending on context. agbádá Priestly robes. àgbàdo Corn, sacred to the Divine Messenger (Èsù). àgbaiyé The entire world. àgbákò Misfortune, disaster, meaning: “without elders.” àgbàla Yard near a house, usually inclosed by a wall or a fence. àgbàlágbà Elder, very old person. Ágbálé Head of the household. àgbálù The entire village.

13. Agbami The mist that arises from the ocean, an aspect of the Spirit of the Ocean (Olókun). agbára Force, power, strength depending on context. agbasà Sacred stone, the Spirit of a sacred stone. Agbára Elder, person in authority, the word is also used to express power, spiritual strength and authority, used in reference to someone who speaks with authority, depending on context. àgbègbè Surrounding district, outer portion of a village. agbégbò Hen. agbéledi One of the wrestling moves used in the marital art that is sacred to the Spirit of Iron (Ògún). àgbere Intercourse, sexual interaction. agbéró Charm used by those who practice the martial art of the Spirit of Iron (Ògún), used to insure that the person remains standing during a martial arts contest. àgbé Short sword sacred to the Spirit of Iron (Ògún), farmer depending on context. agbèje Pumpkin, sacred to the Spirit of the River (Osun). agbe Woodcock, cockatoo. agbégilére Woodcarver, a profession that is generally sacred to the Spirit of Lightning (Sàngó). Àgbìgbò Elemental spirit of the Forest that is know for causing trouble. agbo Medicine, poultice. àgbò Ram, sacred to the Spirit of Lightning (Sàngó). agbo A circle of dancers at a religious ceremony. agbó atò Long life, a common greeting among Ifá initiates.

14. agbolé House, collection of houses forming a compound that is generally used by a single extended family. agbòn Basket weaved from rafia. àgbon Coconut, sacred to the Spirit of the King of White Cloth (Obàtálá). agbon Chin. agbón Wasp. Agbónire A praise name for the Spirit of Destiny (Òrúnmìlà), meaning: “Hunter of Good Fortune.” Agbónìrègún A praise name for the Spirit of Destiny (Òrúnmìlà), meaning: “Hunter of the Medicine of Good Fortune. àgbònrín Chin. agére Stilt dancer who dances as part of the ceremonies that honor the Spirit of the Ancestors (Egún). agé Small drum that is sacred to the Spirit of the Farm (Òrìsà Oko). agemo Chameleon. Agemo Spirit of the Forest worshipped in the Ijebu region of Nigeria. Agesinyowa One of the council of sixteen diviners (Babaláwo) who perform divination of the King (Òòni) of Ilé Ifè. aginiso Word for snail used by devotees of the Spirit of the River (Osun) who have a taboo against using the word igbin. agiyan The ant hill, sacred to the Spirit of Destiny (Òrúnmìlà) as a symbol of hard work and cooperation. agò Sacred cloth used by dancers who are mediums for the Spirit of the Ancestors (Egún). àgò Expression for asking permission to enter a house. agogo Bell used as musical instrument to praise the Forces of Nature (Òrìsà).

15. agogo – eiye The beak of a bird, sacred to the Spirit of the Mothers (Ìyáàmi). Agongo ogo Praise name for the Divine Messenger (Èsù), meaning: “He Who Carries a Club.” Àguala The planet Venus, sacred to the Spirit of the River (Osun). It is also known as the companion of the Moon or the dog of the Moon. The Spirit of Venus. Agunmola The planet Venus, sacred to the Spirit of the River (Osun). It is also known as the companion of the Moon or the dog of the Moon. The Spirit of Venus. Agúnmu Medicine that is prepared by pounding it into a powder with a mortar and pestle. àgùtàn Sheep. ahere Farm hut. ahun Miser. aibi One who has no children, a form of bad fortune in Ifá divination. aifoya Being without fear, courage. aigbo – àiyé Tranquility, being at peace in the world, the sign of one who has developed inner certainty. áike Ax, the double headed ax is sacred to the the Spirit of Lightning (Sàngó). aikú Immortality, one who has become a deified ancestor, meaning: “never die.” àilábùku Spotless, being without blame, a reference to the good character of the Spirit of the King of White Cloth (Obàtálá). àiláiyà Coward. àiléso Barren, without children, one of the forms of bad fortune in Ifá divination. aile Evening.

16. ailébi One who has not experienced misfortune, an indication of someone who is of good character. ailésè A person of very good character, someone who is above suspicion. ailówò Poverty, one of the forms of bad fortune in Ifá divination. ailórò The inability to invoke or manifest any form of abundance, one of the forms of bad fortune in Ifá divination. àìsàn Illness. àìtó Personal element of a ritual that takes into account the circumstances of the individual who is turning towards religious ceremony as a vehicle of personal transformation. aiyapa One who travels on a straight path towards spiritual growth. aiyé The surface of the Earth, in Ifá scripture it is the place where the Realm of the Ancestors (Egún) meets the realm of humans. aiyéraiyé Forever, since the beginning of time, immortal. ajá Dog, black dogs are sacred to the Spirit of Iron (Ògún). àjà Ceiling. aja A wild vine that is sacred to the Spirit of Birds (Ìyáàmi). ajabo A protection charm sacred to the Spirit of Iron (Ògún). ajagun Devotee of the Spirit of Iron (Ògún) who functions as a soldier. ajagun – obinrin Female devotee of the Spirit of Iron (Ògún) who functions as a soldier. ajako Jackal. àjanakú Elephant, sacred to the Spirit of the King of White Cloth (Obàtálá). Àjàláiyé The Winds of the Earth, an aspect of the Spirit of the Wind (Oya).

17. Àjàlórun The Winds of the Realm of the Ancestors, an aspect of the Spirit of the Wind (Oya). A – jà – má – jèbi Praise name for the Spirit of the Mothers (Ìyáàmi), meaning: “She Who Is Never Guilty.” Àjàlá – mòpin One of the Spirits who shapes the head and forms the consciousness of each new born child. Aja – Osun The planet Venus, sacred to the Spirit of the River (Osun), also known as the companion of the Moon or the dog of the Moon, the Spirit of Venus. Ajapa Tortoise, one of the animal totems or guides of the Spirit of the Divine Messenger (Èsù), the tortoise is the Divine Messenger for the Spirit of Lightning (Sàngó). àjé The Spirit of a Bird used by women (Ìyáàmi) to invoke powers used for abundance and justice. This same power is used to consecrate the crown of the Yorùbá Kings. Also used as a reference to money or abundance. ajeji Forgiveness. àjèjì Strange. Aje – ju – Oogùn Praise name for the Spirit of Destiny (Òrúnmìlà), meaning: “Stronger than Medicine.” Aje Saluga Elemental Spirit of Abundance, sacred to the Spirit of the Mothers (Ìyáàmi). ajidèwe Medicine used to restore vigor. Ajígúmwà The sun, the Spirit of the Sun. Ajiki Praise name for the Source of Creation (Olórun), meaning: “The One Who is Praised First.” It also may be used as a reference to the personal Spirit of any given individual. In reference to the Spirit of the Divine Messenger (Èsù) it is used to indicate that the Divine Messenger (Èsù) is addressed first in most ritual. Ajiletepowo A reference to the center point of the diviner’s tray (òpón Ifá) and a reference to the centering principle as an aspect of Ifá spiritual discipline, meaning: “An early riser who sits down and prospers.”

18. àjínde The Spirit of a deceased ancestor (Egún) who speaks at their own funeral through a medium (Egúngún). àjísà Charms used for protection. àjo Meeting, gathering of a group of people. àjó Journey, used in reference to the spiritual journey of self discovery that occurs throughout life. ajobi Ancestors of a woman, matralineal ancestors (Ayélalà Egún). Ajogún Destructive Spirits that bring death, disease and poverty. These Spirits are generally associated with the Spirit of the Divine Messenger (Èsù) and are considered an aspect of the balancing dynamic that occurs in Nature. ajojó Dancing for the Spirits (Orìsà). àjò l’ayé Journey through the world, the entire spectrum of a person’s personal experience. ajomisanra The eternal dew, a symbolic reference to the fountain of life or the spiritual source of physical rejuvenation. Aj ori The Spirit of the daughter of the Spirit of Lightning (Sàngó), meaning: “Bird of the Inner Spirit.” àjo sepò Cooperation. ajoyin – ibon The firing of muskets, traditionally muskets are fired while making offerings to the Spirit of Iron (Ògún). ajugu dunirín A pile of iron in or near a shrine used as an altar for the Spirit of Iron (Ògún). akàbà Ladder. The ladder is sacred to the Spirit of the Divine Messenger (Èsù). àkala Vulture, sacred to the Spirit of the River (Osun). àkarà Bread cakes cooked in palm oil, sacred to the Spirit of the Ancestors (Egún). àkàtànpó Hunter’s tool, sacred to the Spirit of Iron (Ògún).

19. àké Ax, sacred to the Spirit of the Farm (Orìsà Oko), the double headed ax is sacred to the Spirit of Lightning (Sàngó).8888 àkébàjé Over indulgent behavior, one of the sources of bad fortune in Ifá divination. A – kè – bí – àlà Praise name for the Spirit of the King of White Cloth (Obàtálá), meaning, “Radiant White.” akere Frog. akese Cotton. Cotton is sacred to the Spirit of the King of White Cloth (Obàtálá). aki Bravery, also the word for refering to the martial art practiced by the devotees of the Spirit of Iron (Ògún). akika Pangolin plant (Uromanis Longicanda Briss ). Akiko Cock, male chicken. Male chickens are sacred to the Spirit of most Warriors (Ibora). akin Hero, heroic person and heroic action. ako Sheath of a knife. The sheath of a knife is used as an offering to the Spirit of Destiny (Òrúnmìlà). The word also means male. àkóbí First born. Akódá One of the Prophet Òrúnmìlà’s first two students, term also used to identify a senior priest in a society of diviners. akòja Fulfillment, the purpose of following one’s destiny. àkókò Season of the year. àkókò – éèrùn Dry season. àkókò – ojo Rainy season. àkókò – otútù Cold season. àkókò – oyé Windy season. akokoro Toothache.

20. akókò ti obinrin Female puberty rite, meaning: “season of becoming a woman.” akókò ti okunrin Male puberty rite, meaning: “season of becoming a man.” A – kò – mò – ó – tán Praise name for the Spirit of Destiny (Òrúnmìlà ), meaning: “Not to Have Full Knowledge of You is to Fail.” akóni Teacher. akoni Brave warrior, a strong person who may be remembered as a deified ancestor, the word is also used to suggest that something is true. The word is used to describe the Spirit of the Warriors (Ibora). ako – ojo Five day week that is used as the basis for the Ifá calender of ritual events. akun Religious bead. akúnlèbo Kneeling to worship. àkúnlèyàn Destiny as choice, or the act of free will. àkúnlègbà Destiny which is altered by free will. akunnu Fruitful, productive. alá Owner. Álá Light in the Spiritual sense of that which brings illumination or enlightenment, also a reference to the Spirit of Light, also refers to white cloth in both literal and symbolic terms. The symbol of white cloth is a reference to moral purity. àlà White cloth, dream, effective dreamer, one who has visions while sleeping. In Ifá scripture white cloth is a symbolic reference to dreams and mystic vision. Alááànú Spirit that helps shape consciousness prior to birth, meaning: “The Merciful One.” aláàfia A greeting that means peace, good fortune and abundance. Aláàfin The traditional title for the King of Oyo, chief Priest of the Council of elders (Ogboni).

21. aláàye Someone who is living, a person of the Earth, as opposed to spirit or ancestor. alábalàse Forever. Alábalese Praise name for the Spirit of the King of White Cloth (Obàtálá), meaning: “He Who Predicts the Future.” Alabalòtún The Spirit of the One who implements with the right, a reference to the right side of the horizontal line on the diviner’s tray (òpón Ifá). Aláde Prince, a male descendant of one of the original families that founded the Yorùbá federation. Aláféèri One who knows the secret to the charm that makes one invisible. This medicine is commonly used to make a person invisible to their enemies in the sense that they will not be bothered rather than physically invisible. Some forms of this medicine can create telaportation. alafogún Owner of medicine, reference to a herbal doctor. Alàgba Elder, also the title for the chief priest of the Society of Ancestor Reverence in Ilè Ifé. Alágemo Member of men’s society in Ijebu region that honors the Spirit of the Chameleon. alágbò Medicine pot. alaifoiya One who is fearless, a person of courage. aláìgbón Foolish, one who is ignorant of the Light. aláìsí Physical death. alaiyeluwà Greetings said to an Oba. Alajìki Praise name for the Divine Messenger (Èsù), meaning: “One who is addressed first.” This is a reference to the fact that The Divine Messenger is usually addressed first during ritual. àlákala Nightmare. The realm of nightmares is controlled by the Spirit of Nightmares (Sigidi).

22. alakete Calabash of light, one of the Primal Sources of Creation. alákorí Useless person, lazy person. alála One who is an effective dreamer, a person who has visions in their sleep. Alamorere Praise name for the Spirit of the King of White Cloth (Obàtálá), meaning: “Owner of the best clay.” alangba Lizard. Alápìíni Chief Priest of the Ancestor Society in Oyo. aláràbarà Multi colored. alárinrin Fine, fancy. alaromo One who wishes another harm or bad fortune, a person who makes use of hexes. aláse Person of power. Alaselòsì The Spirit of the One who implements with the left, a reference to the left side of the horizontal line on the divining tray (òpón Ifá), usually refers to that which is hidden or unrevealed. Alásotele Prophet, one who is able to see into the future. Àláwo Word used to identify an Ifá initiate who is still in training as a diviner. aláya Husband. àlàyé Explanation. àle Leprosy. alé Evening. àlejò Visitor. alésùjáde A person who is skilled at terminating possession by unwelcome or destructive spirits, an exorcists.

23. Àlo – ìràntàn Sacred history. àlòkù Second hand. alubarika Property. Alúdùndún Òrun Guardian of personal destiny in the Realm of the Ancestors, the Source of personal destiny. alukerese Creeping plant (Ipomoea involucrata ). alunipa Executioner, a member of the society of elders (Ogboni). Amáiyégún Praise name for the Spirit of Destiny (Òrúnmìlà), meaning: “The Guardian of Medicine on Earth.” àmààní Opportunity. amo Lizard. Amodi Sickness. Amodídá Praise name for the Spirit of Destiny (Òrúnmìlà), meaning: “One Who cuts through sickness.” Àmòká The Spirit of the Sun, and the Sun itself. amokisitekun Panther. Amòlà Ifé Owòdáyé Praise name for the Spirit of Destiny (Òrúnmìlà), meaning: “The Savior of Ifé from the early days.” amomotán Imperfect knowledge, the human finite perception of the infinite. Amónisègùn – mápò Praise name for the Divine Messenger (Èsù), meaning: “The medicine pouch that guides us to the Immortals.” amotélè The ability to see into the future, clairvoyance. amu Jar or pot. amulu Combination. Amúlù Odù The verses of Ifá scripture that follow the first sixteen verses (Olu Odù).

24. amure Sash worn by men around the waist as a symbol of balance between male and female Forces in Nature (Òrìsà). Amúsan One of the children of the Spirit of the wind, the person who holds a switch and walks in front of Egúngún during ancestral ceremonies, acts as a guardian for the medium. amòye Wise elder, one who is able to give good council and advice. àná Yesterday. àna In – law. anamó Sweet potato. àníàní Doubt. anife One who has no mate, being without love or affection, one of the forms of bad fortune in Ifá divination. anípé One who has abundance in all things, one who has fulfilled their destiny. apá Arm, side or direction depending on context. apáko Bamboo. àpárá Joke. apàrá – inù Conscience. apari Bald head. Àpárí – inú Inner Spirit. apáta Rock, the rock is sacred to most Forces in Nature (Òrìsà). àpè Prayer. Apetebi The Spirit of the wife of the Spirit of Destiny (Òrúnmìlà) an initiated position within Ifá that is held by those women who are married to Ifá initiates. àpeere Perfection or completion, the goal of spiritual growth and development.

25. apeja Fisherman. apiwo Cure for negative medicine, or for the removal of a hex. àpò Bag often refers to bag used to carry medicine and tools associated with ritual work, also refers to charms carried by worshippers of the Spirit of Iron (Ògún). apó Quiver, sacred to the Spirit of the Tracker (Òsóòsì). àpo’gùn Medicine pouch. àpo onísègùn Medicine pouch. àpótí Box. ara Body, self, people, depending on context. ara – ile Friends and relatives, members of the extended family. ará Thunder, sacred to the Spirit of Lightning (Sàngó) and the Spirit of the Wind (Oya). Àràbà A senior Ifá priest who is initiated into Mysteries that are associated with protection from the Spirit of Infectious Disease (Babaluaiyé). arábìnrin Sister. araiye People of the Earth. arákùnrin Brother. àràn Ifá drum. Àríwa North, also refers to the Spirits of the North. aráiye The people of the world. aré Play, the performance of a scared story. arewa Beauty. arigogo Hook.

26. Àríwá North, also refers to Spirits of the North. ariwo Hook, noise depending on context. ariwowo Hook. aro Sadness. aró Indigo dye used to color cloth. aro Plant used in Ifá for protection from death (Crossopoteryx Febrifuga), disabled person sacred to the Spirit of the King of White Cloth (Obàtálá). aròn Worm. Ar oni Spirit of the forest, elemental spirit with the body of a human and the head of a dog. Aronimoja Elemental spirit of the forest. aròn ìro Hernia. aróso Material used to wrap around the body as a dress, frequently used when dancing for the Forces in Nature. arugbo Old person. Arúku Spirit who transforms and elevates the spirit of the ancestors. àrùn Illness or disease. arùn ara Illness of the body. arùn eegun Illness of the bones. arùn èjè Illness of the blood. asán Afternoon. àsaro Meditation. àsásí Hexing. asèje Food prepared as medicine. àsà Custom, tradition.

27. asaájú Group leader. àse Spiritual Power, that which brings dynamic force into Being in the Universe, the word is also used at the end of prayers meaning: “May it be so.” The phrase is intended to be an invocation rather than a request. àsé Menstruation. Àsedá One of the Prophet Òrúnmìlà first two students, term also used to identify a senior priest with a communal society of Ifá elders. àsèhindè The expected reincarnation of a revered elder. asejù Excess. aseni Unknown enemy. àsikò Time. Asin – mo – l’égbàá – ìyànjú Praise name for the Spirit of Infectious Disease (Babaluaiyé), meaning: “The Mystery of Power that Comes from Eating the Yam.” asíri Mystery, secret depending on context. àsíse Mistake. asiwèré Person suffering from mental illness. Asògún One who worships the Spirit of Iron (Ògún). aso Cloth, clothing frequently used in reference to clothing that has religious significance. aso – ìbojú Viel used to cover the face of mediums in possession with the Spirit of Forces in Nature (Orìsà). aso pupa Red cloth, taboo for traditional Ifá /Òrìsà burial rituals. A – sòrò – dayò Praise name for the Spirit of Destiny (Òrúnmìlà), meaning: “One Who Makes Things Prosper.” àsotélè Prophecy, one who predicts the future based on an assessment of current circumstances.

28. asoyé Explaining the inner essence or true meaning of a thing or an event, the purpose of Ifá divination is to discover the true meaning of circumstances. ata Pepper. àtakò Opposition. Ata – mátàsé Praise name for the Spirit of the Tracker (Òsóòsì), meaning: “The sharp shooter.” atana Crossroads, home of the Divine Messenger (Èsù). ataparako Thumb. atàpárìnyénkú Halting, with caution. atare Hot peppers used in food and medicine, in Ifá it is eaten to prepare the mouth for certain types of prayers. àtàrí Top of the head, also refers to the power center at the top of the head. àtàtà Real, honest, genuine depending on context. àte Mat, the mat is used to establish sacred space for ritual and divination. até To spread. atèhìnkú Premature death. àte – ìká Rafia mat used for sacred space during divination. Àté – ìká – ení Reference to all of Creation, meaning: ” the mat that can’t be rolled up.” atéléwo Palm of the hand. Até Òrìsà Circular tray or mat used in cowrie shell divination. àterúdérú Ancestor who suffered in slavery. àtéwó Palm of the open hand, also used to mean avert.

29. ati And, with, to depending on context. àtijó Some time ago, in the past. àtitàn Refuse heap, sacred to the power of transformation that is related to some aspects of the Divine Messenger (Èsù). Ato Female priestess in ancestral reverence societies (Egúngún). àtò Seamen. Atokùn Leader of a society for ancestor reverence. Atóónàlórógùn Praise name for the Spirit of Iron (Ògún), meaning: “Hefty Hunter.” atori Stick (Glyphaea laterifiora ) that is sacred to the Spirit of the Ancestors (Egún), atòsí Gonorrhoea. àtúnbi Born again, the Ifá word used for physical reincarnation. àtúnwá Rebirth of character, the Ifá word used for reincarnation of the soul. Àwàlàwúlú Praise name for the Spirit of Iron (Ògún), meaning: “Rugged and Rough Spirit.” awo Mystery, diviner. awó Guinea hen. àwo Dish, plate. awo’de The Mystery of Hunting. awomi Invoking Spirits through the use of water. awò Color. awo Skin, hide. àwon Them, they, group. Awoni The society of Ifá priests who divine for the King (Òòni) of Ilé Ifè.

30. Àwònyè Òrìsà Praise name for the Spirit of Iron (Ògún), meaning: “The enraged Spirit.” àwùjè Top of the head, refers to the power center at the crown of the skull. awuje Butter beans (Phaseolus lunatus ) àwùjo Meeting, gathering. awun Miser. awure Unassuming. aya Wife. Ayaba The wife of the queen. àyán Tree sacred to the Spirit of Lightning (Sàngó). ayani explanation. àyànmó Destiny, the Ifá belief that each person comes to the world having an agreement with Creation regarding the fate that is to be experienced during a given life time. àyànmó – ìpín Destiny, the Ifá belief that each person comes to the World having an agreement with Creation regarding the fate which is to be experienced during a given life time. Ayànràbàtá – awo – lè – ojà Praise name for the Divine Messenger (Èsù), aye Room. ayé World. Ayélalà The collective Spirit of Ancestral Mothers. ayebo Hen. ayo Joy. B

31. ba To join, should depending on context. bá To meet, to find, against. Sometimes used as a shorten version of ìbá which means should. bà To see. Báàbà Something that is great. Báàlè Chief of a village, usually of lesser status than an Oba which is an initiated position that is granted directly by the Òòni of Ilé Ifè. Bàbà Guinea corn. Baba Father, used to describe any male adult old enough to have children. In Yorùbá culture it is impolite to call someone who is older by their proper name, instead they are called by their title or called by the word that indicates their relative age within the extended family. Babaláwo Father of the Secrets, male initiate into the Mysteries of Ifá. The term Babaláwo is generally reserved for the elder Ifá initiates in a given community, especially those who are adept at Ifá divination. Babagba Older man, usually a grandfather. Babal’órìsà Father of the Forces in Nature (Òrìsà), male initiate into the Mysteries of Nature (Awo Òrìsà). Babaluàiyé Spirit of the Surface of the Earth, this is the Spirit associated with those infectious diseases that are carried by the wind across the surface of the earth during dry and hot times of the year. Babansìnkú Chief priest responsible for leading a funeral. Babanlá Grandfather, meaning father of the light or wisdom. Babatúnde Name given to a child who carries the ancestral spirit of their father, meaning:”Father Returns.” bádámajèmú To make a sacred oath or agreement with another person or group of people.

32. báde To hunt in a group. báfohùn To talk with someone. bájà To fight. bàjé To spoil, to eat with someone, to associate with someone, or to talk with someone depending on context bala Spotted. bàlagà To come to maturity, to be identified as an adult. balè To touch the ground in front of an elder as a sign of respect. Balògun The chief of the society of warriors. bambi Guide me, or give birth, may refer to spiritual re-birth. Bámbi Praise name for the Spirit of Lightning (Sàngó), meaning: “Spiritually reborn.” bámúbámú Full. banújé To be sad. Ba-ohun-mimo-je To make profane use of sacred objects. Bara A Praise name for the Divine Messenger (Èsù), a reference to the Divine Messenger’s strength. barapetu Great, a person of distinction. bàtá Drum sacred to Spirit of Lightning (Sàngó) and to the ancestors (Egúngun). bàta Foot. bàtà Shoe. bawo ni? How are you? báyi Thus, like this. bè To beg for something, to supplicate Spirit.

33. bé To cut, to cut off. bebe An important accomplishment. bèbè To implore. bèbè-ojú Eyebrow, eyelid, area around the eye. béè So, like. béèkó It is not so, no. béèni It is so, yes. beleje Slender. Bèmbé Drum used in Hausa religious ceremonies. be – ni This is. bere To ask. Bérè A term of dignity and respect used in reference to elder woman. bere To bend down. bèrèsí To begin. bí Placed at the end of a sentence to indicate that a question is doubtful. bikita Show. bínú To be angry, to be mad. biribiri Very dark. bisha – bisha The movements of a dancer. bò To cover. bo To enter. bò To arrive. bó To escape. boro Narrow

34. bòròkìnní Gentleman, well behaved person. bóyá – bóyá Perhaps, maybe. bu Dip. bú To cut. burú Bad, negative, destructive. burúkú Place of extreme confusion, describes a condition of consciousness in which there is little hope for spiritual transformation, also means very bad, very negative, very destructive.

35. D da To cast divination. dá To create, to cause. dà To cast metal, to pour. dáàdáá Good, or beautiful. dabi To resemble. dabòbò To protect, to provide a shield or screen. dabò To stop. Dada The Spirit of Vegetables, also the guardian Spirit new born children with large tufts of hair. dáfá The process of divination used by Ifá priests that makes use of either sixteen ikin (Sacred palm nuts) or an opèlé (Sacred chain with eight nuts attached). dàgbà Aging, to become old, to grow up. dàgalágbà Becoming an adult male. dáhùn To speak, to answer. dáhùnfun To take responsibility, to speak with purity. dájó Dancing alone, a single dancer. dájó To settle a dispute. dáke To be silent. dákeroro To be calm. dako To circumcise, also refers to an offering to the Divine Messenger (Èsù). dakùn Please, or excuse me.

36. dalè To break a promise, to violate an oath. dálókerú To free a person from slavery. dámájèmú To make a binding agreement. dámòràn To advise. dáná To make a fire. dáni To beat someone in a wrestling match. danindanin Important. dànsíkí Short gown, long shirt. dára Good, to be good, to look good. dáradára Very good, all right. dárò To be sympathetic. dáwò To consult divination. de To arrive, to arise, to stand up depending on context. dé To cover, to arrive. déédéé Exactly. délade To crown a King (Oba). délé To arrive at home. dèlóna To prevent progress, to restrict travel, refers to restrictions on the path of spiritual growth. de To trap. dekun To stop. dèngé Porridge, also pap used as the foundation for Ifá medicine. désè Action that is in opposition to the Will of Nature (Òrìsà) or the development of good character.

37. dewo The temptation to act in opposition to the development of good character. di To become, also refers to casting either a spell or casting divination. dì Ti tie. dí To block , to obstruct. Dídá Creation in Nature and the act of being creative. dídá – ara Good health. dídàgbà Growth. dídara Good. dìde To stand up, to get up. didé To arrive. didupe The process of giving thanks, may refer to thanking the ancestors (Egún) or Forces in Nature (Òrìsà). díè Some. dígbóò Hunter’s clothing. dígí Mirror, sacred to the Spirit of the River (Osun). dínà To obstruct, to cause disruption. dípò To replace. dobale To prostrate as a sign of respect to either a shrine or an elder. do – do Far. dòdò Fried plantan. dógba To be equal. dojúko To confront. dójúso To look at. doyi To spin.

38. dùbúlè To lie down. du – du Big. dúdu Black, also refers to the mystery of that which cannot be seen. dùn Good tasting, sweet. dun – dun Cold. dùndú Fried yam. dùndún Talking drum. dúpé To give thanks. dúró To stand. E ebe Yams, sacred to the Spirit of the River (Osun). ebi Hunger. eburú Elemental spirits that work with the Spirit of Infectious disease (Babaluàiyé). èdè Language. èdé Buffalo, sacred to the Spirit of the Wind (Oya). èdèàìyédè Misunderstanding, argument. éèdì Charm, or spell. éègun Bones, human bones. eélòó How much? éèpà Greeting, announcing a procession of members of the male council of elders (Ogboni). Èdùmàrè Regional dialect for Source of Creation, (Olodumare).

39. efi Smoke. èfó Broken plate, sacred to the ancestors (Egún). Efufu – lege – lege An aspect of the Spirit of the Wind (Oya), meaning: “The Spirit of the Gentle Breeze.” Efunle Ifá plant (Orchidaeeae ) egbe Loss. Egbé Whirlwind, an aspect of the Spirit of the Wind (Oya). égbéé Protective charm for the Spirit of Iron (Ògún). egbin Antelope. egiri Ifá medicine used as protection from the Spirit of Death (Iku). egbò Sore. ègbodò Yams. egbódo Slice yam. egbòogi Medicine. ègede Incantation, invocations used to raise power (ase). egbónó Smallpox, spread by the Spirit of Infectious Disease (Babaluàiyé). Égún The Spirit of an ancestor. Egúngún Society of ancestral mediums who perform in masquerade. egungun Silk cotton tree (Ceila pentandra ) also known as the Araba Iroko tree. egurè Village. egunsi Melon seeds, sacred to the Spirit of the River (Osun). eji Rain.

40. Èjìlá Seborà Name of verse (Odù) used in cowrie divination (mérìndínlógún). Èjì Ogbe Name of first verse (Odù) of Ifá divination. ejò Snake. Ejòkò Name of verse (Odù) used in cowrie divination (mérìndínlógún). Ejò – kò -k’omo – re – léhìn – yoyo Praise name for the Spirit of Infectious Diseases (Babaluàiyé). Ejúbonà Sacred shrine. Ejufiri The Spirit that shapes consciousness, the foundation of inner strength. ejurin Ifá leaf (Momordica Balsamina M. Charantia ). èké Liar, falsehood, deceitful person. ekeji Second. Èkèmí Praise name for the Source of Being (Olórun). ekó Ifá charm used for protection for female Ifá worshippers. eko – dide Red parrot tail feather, essential sacred symbol used in Ifá and Òrìsà initiation. ékú Rat, sacred to the Spirit of Destiny (Òrúnmìlà) and the Divine Messenger (Èsù). èkùró Palm nuts used for Ifá divination (ikin). ekútè Bush rat. ekúté Mouse èkùlù Deer. èkuru White bean meal. èle Violence. èlè Knife with a long blade.

41. elégbògi Herbal healer. elekejieni Spiritual double, higher self. elénìní Elemental spirits that block human growth, they are usually generated by interalized fear. eléré The Spirit of a child who dies young and reincarnates with the same destiny, same as àbikú. Elésù One who worships the Spirit of the Divine Messenger (Èsù) elétùtu A person who makes an offering to elevate their inner spirit. eléyi This one? elu Stranger. èlubó Yam flower. eluju Field. èmi I (personal pronoun), me. emini Dampness. ènìà Person, people. èniakénia A person who harbors negative feelings or destructive intentions. enígbó Animal tracks in the forest. enìní Enemy. enini Slanderer. enini Morning dew. Eníyán The Spirit of a bird sacred to the society of women (Ìyáàmi). epa Hail, traditional greeting to Yorùbá Kings (Oba). èpé Curse or hex involving the use of a charm.

42. epo Palm oil, sacred to most male Forces in Nature (Òrìsà). Staple in traditional Yoruba diet. erè Boa constrictor, sacred to the Spirit of the Rainbow (Osumare). èrè Gain. eré Spontaneity. ère Statue of a Force of Nature (Òrìsà), usually carved from wood. eré isinkú Improvised aspects of a funeral ritual. erin Elephant, sacred to the Spirit of the King of White Cloth (Obàtálá). erinkà Corn on the cob. Erinlè Elephant also the Spirit of Song. èrò Thought, people depending on context. èro Person on a spiritual pilgrimage. èrokéró Negative intentions, the desire to do harm. eru Handle, also refers to ashes from a fire. erú Load. eruko The handle of a hoe or farming tool. erupe Dirt. eruwa funfun Ifá herb (Andropogon Gayanus ). èsè Dye. èsè – àluko Purple dye. Eshinrinmofgbo Praise name for the Invisible Realm of the Ancestors (Orun). èsì Reply. èsin Last year.

43. Esinsin Fly. eso Fruit, common offering for Forces in Nature (Òrìsà). Èsú The Spirit of the Divine Messenger, who also as a role as the Spirit of the Divine Trickster and the Spirit of the Divine Enforcer. esun Ifá herb, elephant grass (Pennisetun purpureum ). eti Ear. èto Personal elements of a ritual, variation on traditional rituals that speak to the immediate need of the person or people involved. etu Blue and white woven cloth. etutu Atonement. ètùtù An offering designed to place the individual in alignment with the will of the ancestors and the will of Nature. ewé Leaf. ewé Ifá Ifá herb (Uraria picta ). ewé – owo Ifá herb, leaf of honor (Brillantisia patala ). èwe Young person. èwo Which one? ewo Taboo, religious restriction designed to keep a person on their path of destiny. ewu Danger. ewú Grey hair, or white hair, a sign of dignity. eukéwu Danger, peril. ewure Female goat. eyi This. eyiti That, or that which.

44. E e You. èbá Boiled gari, vicinity depending on context. èbi Fault, guilt. èbí Family. èbádó The bank of the river, sacred to the Spirit of the River (Osun). èbáti Temple, sacred shrine. ebe Request. ebo Life force offering to either Forces of Nature (Òrìsà) or ancestors (Egún). èbora Strong, brave man, also a reference to the Forces of Nature (Òrìsà), that provide protection, ie the Divine Messenger (Èsú), the Spirit of the Guardian of Consciousness (Osun), the Spirit of the Tracker (Òsóòsì), and the Spirit of Iron (Ògún). ebùn Gift. ebura tapa Ifá herb (Nupe Egungun ). eburu Destructive elemental spirit. eda Creature. Èdán A rod or a staff, also the name of the male aspect of the Spirit of the Earth (Onile). Èdán àrá Thunderstone, sacred to the Spirit of Lightning (Sàngó). èda – óro A pun, commonly used in Ifá scripture to make a spiritual point through the use of humor. edùn Ax, sacred to the Spirit of Lightning (Sango). èfè Singing and clowning during ceremonies honoring the Maternal Ancestors (Gelede), also refers to making a joke.

45. èfó Green vegetables. efon Buffalo, sacred to the Spirit of Wind (Oya). èfóri Headache. efun White chalk, sacred to the Spirit of the King of the White Cloth (Obàtálá) and the Spirit of the Ocean (Olókun). efún Charm or spell usually associated with creating some form of attraction. efunle Ifá herb, leaf of good fortune Evouns alsinoides ). ègbé Community of people with a common purpose, or a society of people. ègbe Cooked beans. egbe Companion. Egbéògbà Spirit honored by the society of women (Ìyáàmi). egede Medicine used for protection against the Spirit of Death (Iku) egbón Elder. egun Thorn on a bush. ehin Back. èhin – òla The future. eiye Bird. eiyele Bird of the house, a reference to elemental spirit of a bird worshipped by the society of women (Iyáàmi). eja Fish. ejé Blood, sacred to most Forces in Nature (Òrìsà). ejó Court case. èjo Ifá The interpretation of Ifá scripture (Odù) during divination.

46. Ekáàbò Welcome. eketa Third. eko Cornstach gruel. èkó Teaching, education. èkókékó The teaching of false doctrine, or the teaching of inaccurate information. Èkó Mímó Spiritual lessons, the study of spiritual matters. eko mimu Cornstach cruel. ekùn Weeping, also refers to Ancestor masquerade. ekun Tears. ekùn Leopard, sacred to the Spirit of Iron (Ògún). Èlà The Spirit of Purity, the First Reincarnation of the Spirit of Destiny (Òrúnmìlà). It is also the name given to the ceremony that celebrates the first harvest of yams. This ceremony is an important aspect of the Ifá calender of seasonal celebrations. ela Ifá herb (Epiphytic Orchidaceae ). Elédà Creator, associated with the power center between the eyes. elédè Pig. Elégbà A person of good character, also refers to one of the aspects of the Divine Messenger (Èsú). Elégára The aspect of the Divine Messenger (Èsú) associated with the Spirit of the Trickster. èléiye Bird woman, reference to a woman who works with an elemental bird spirit in the soceity of women (Iyáàmi). eléni Person dancing with the mask of the Chameleon (Agemo). eléri Witness.

47. Elérìn – ìpin Praise name of the Spirit of Destiny (Òrúnmìlà), meaning; “Witness to Creation.” èlúku Secret society. elomiran Another person. emere Elemental spirit. Emesè Society of Ifá priests who say prayers on a daily basis for the Yorùbá Nation. èmí Breath, also refers to the human soul. Èmí Òrìsà Spirit of a Force in Nature (Òrìsà). Èmi Mimo Spirit of the Creator. emirin Next year. emu Palm wine. en Expression of agreement, spoken by Ifá priests when someone is receiting Ifá scripture to indicate that a particular verse has been repeated correctly. eni Person, also the name given to a mat used for divination. eni – kan One person. eni – òwo A revered elder. eniti Who, the person who. eni – ti Person that. enu Mouth. enu – òna Doorway, passageway, gate. enu geru The entrance to a palace. enyin You. epa Peanut.

48. èpa Small jars of medicine. epere Better. eran Animal, meat. eran – ebo The animal used for a life force offering to Forces in Nature (Òrìsà) or to the spirit of the ancestors (Egún). eranko Wild animal. eri River. erin Laughter. Erinla Cow. èrí – okàn Conscience. èrò Soothing quality, generally associated with women or female Forces in Nature (Òrìsà). erù Load. èrù Fear. èrúbo Obligation to make an offering to Spirit, based on divination. erun Tree used for making charcoal. Ifá uses characoal as medicine for spiritual elevation and for physical healing. èsà – owó Small cowries. ese Row, foot depending on context. esè Foot, or track in the earth. esè Ifá Verse of Ifá scripture (Odù). esè Odù Verse of Ifá scripture (Odù). Esè Opón Foot or bottom, of the Ifá divining tray. ese Breaking. Èsèntáiyé Naming ceremony.

49. esin Horse. esisu Queen aunt, used in some forms of Ifá medicine. ètè Leprosy. etù Guinea hen, sacred to the Spirit of Destiny (Òrúnmìlà) and the Spirit of the Wind (Oya). ètù Ifá medicine that is burned on a fire. ewà Beauty. èwà Beans. èwè Also. ewon Ifá herb (Acacia ataxacantha ). èwòn Chain. èyà Cultural group of people. eyin Egg. F fa To pull. fá To wipe, or to clean. fà To pull. fadákà Silver, sacred to Ifá. fàfose To predict the future. fàfòsese The use of ritual to transform problems. faiya To charm or allure. farabalè To be calm.

50. farapamó To be calm. fári To give a haircut with a razor. fe A long time. fèrè Flute. fé To love. felá To act with importance based on holding a position of responsibility. féniyawo To marry. fere The gathering of rain clouds. fi By, with or to depending on context. fi – apatabò The use of shield in self defense. fi – àsefún To give an order. fibò To hide from view. fidan To explore a mystery. fífaragbò Incarnation, the belief in souls returning to earth in different bodies. fiféraeni Self esteem. fifokànsin Spiritual devotion. fifòwòse To do something with reverence. fijì To forgive. fijúbà To give respect. filà Cap. fimó To perform initiation. fipata To make soup.

Part 2 coming soon..

 

~Awo Ifaseun Oyekanmi

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  1. Ajayi Modupe

    A lot of info and when is part 2 coming out

  2. Cinteeyah Clare

    Seen

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